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and development and energy. these are things that are central to our ability to grow the economy, to prepare people for the economy. >> it's such a small part of the budget. >> i understand. but you see, here's what's going on. there are two kinds of approaches to this. the one approach says we've got this deficit problem, and we want to address it. the other is the norquist approach, which is really more about reducing government to its irreducible core. and that is an indiscriminate sort of slashing. that's the wrong path for the country. and that's the path we can't take. >> things have changed so much since i was there. you talk about discretionary versus mandatory. when i was there back in the '90s, you could actually go after discretionary spending and move towards a balanced budget. we're way past that now. you're talking about 11% for domestic discretionary spending. that means everything, outside of defense, outside of medicare, outside of medicaid, outside of social security. that's about 85% of the budget. >> and we just made some pretty deep cuts last summer. >> right. so when yo
the tax code, change this, a tax on gas to help the energy industry, all this stuff has receded into the mist and all we're trying to do is get a deal and be done with this. it is sad. in the beginning of a second term, you should be trying to do big things. >> politics often gets in the way. these guys agree behind closed doors what should be done but nobody wants to step out on the ledge and say it publicly. >> right. you have a polarized congress. at this point, both sides think the other side is not on the level and they're interested in taking the partisan political position than accomplishing a bipartisan result. the good thing is high skilled immigrants. hard not to find someone on both sides that don't think you should allow folks that have expertise in science and technology into the country. instead of doing it, both sides use it as a lever in the immigration debate and keeps getting spooled up inside that debate and nothing gets done. >> haven't the republicans been passing it through the house and democrats won't take it up in the senate. >> they have passed it throu
done from immigration to energy, to education, and you've got to get through this one. not to mention what we're about to get to on foreign policy issues which will serve as a backdrop for the remainder of the term. you've got to get this done to get over that hump. you've got to think the president's focused on it which is why i remain optimistic that it may get done december 20th. >> on the sunday talk shows that you're talking about, let's just strip it down. a man in negotiations does not say to another man, you're going to cave. do you say that to another man in negotiations? and you think you're going to get him to cave? >> no, sloulgabsolutely not. >> oh, please, this is all about men. come on. first of all, a woman would never think saying that because they would lactually be much moe reasonable, and something would actually get done. but if you're going to negotiate as men, you're going to have to find a way to strategically make the other side feel whole while not destroying your own ego at the same time. i didn't understand when i watched the treasury secretary saying oh, y
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)